Will Obama’s Speech in Kansas Dec. 6th Echo Teddy Roosevelt, a Bit of Saul Alinsky and a “dash” of Cass Sunstein?

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Speeches by design; amazing how the White House and Obama think we are a bunch of Homer Simpson style lemmings.

Take a sprinkle of Teddy Roosevelt, add a little Saul Alinsky with a dash of Czar Cass Sunstein (thinks once we realize that people have a little Homer Simpson in them, they can be manipulated) and voila a speech by the great orator.

First Teddy Roosevelt:

OSAWATOMIE, KANSAS — President Obama will give an economic speech in Osawatomie, Kansas Tuesday at a location the White House says was very specific in picking and meant to echo President Teddy Roosevelt.

Roosevelt spoke in the very same town more than 100 years ago on August 31, 1910 where he presented his vision for American and the coming 1912 election.

Sound familiar?

That’s by design.

The White House says they spent a month planning and choosing this location and that there are parallels between how working class families felt then and now.

Roosevelt gave what was called a “New Nationalism” agenda, talking about regulation calling out special interests (even using that term), welfare, human rights and calling for a greater federal government.

At the time the remarks, given to more than 30,000 people, had a wide-range of reaction, even some calling them “communist and “socialist,” according to the Kansas Historical Society.

Others lauded it as a great address.

“This New Nationalism regards the executive power as the steward of the public welfare,” Roosevelt said.

The Obama administration’s take is that Roosevelt’s Osawatomie speech was about a “fair chance, a square deal, and an equal opportunity to succeed,” as stated on the president’ schedule.

Adding that Obama will “talk about how he sees this as a make-or-break moment for the middle class and all those working to join it.”

The word “fair” was used several times in advance of describing the speech. That’s a word Obama has used multiple times, over several months in wrangling with Congress and GOP, saying the wealthiest need to pay their “fair share” in his jobs bill proposal that taxes millionaires.

Read more……….

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From NPR:

In Kansas, Obama Invites Teddy Roosevelt Comparisons

by 

December 6, 2011

Excerpted:

“President Obama seems to look at history as something that can teach the present,” said H.W. Brands of the University of Texas, one of a number of historians who’ve consulted with the president on multiple occasions. “I’m sure he would not be so naive as to think that history predicts the present. But to some extent it frames the range of the possible.”

President Obama seems to look at history as something that can teach the present. I’m sure he would not be so naive as to think that history predicts the present. But to some extent it frames the range of the possible.

– H.W. Brands, University of Texas

Brands is the author of a Roosevelt biography calledT.R.— The Last Romantic.

Roosevelt used his speech to call for a more activist federal government, including thorough policing of the financial system and a graduated tax on high incomes. And just as Roosevelt defended himself against accusations of communism by quoting Abraham Lincoln, Brands said Obama hopes to fend off charges of class warfare by presenting himself as the heir to Republican Roosevelt.

“One of the ways of deflecting criticism is to put your own positions in the mouths of great figures from the past,” he said. “And for Obama, one of the great appeals of Theodore Roosevelt is he’s a recognizable name brand. He’s valued by both parties, even though a lot of what Roosevelt stood for has largely been forgotten.”

The memorable phrase from Roosevelt’s speech is “a square deal,” which includes widespread opportunity and a distribution of wealth that benefits the whole community. Obama sounded a similar note last week in Scranton.

“We believe that if the folks at the bottom and the folks in the middle succeed, then American succeeds, and the folks at the top succeed as well,” he said.

Recently, the Occupy Wall Street movement has shone a spotlight on America’s skewed distribution of income. But Obama was talking about these ideas long before that. In early 2008, then-candidate Obama said the economy is strongest when the middle class grows and opportunity is widely spread.

“When it’s not, when opportunity is uneven or unequal, it is our responsibility to restore balance, and fairness, and keep that promise alive for the next generation,” he said.

What role government should play in keeping that promise is likely to be at the center of next year’s presidential campaign. Brands said Roosevelt’s call for a “New Nationalism” found widespread acceptance a century ago, though Roosevelt himself wound up losing in a three-way race to Woodrow Wilson.

“They split the vote between Roosevelt, who at that time was the Progressive, not the Republican nominee, and Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic nominee. Together they got a very large majority of the vote,” he said. “Roosevelt didn’t win. Wilson did. But progressivism as a whole was the major victor.”

Obama hopes the progressive ideas he’s talking about will prevail again 2012.

**Emphasis added for focal points***

Added AUDIO about speech from NPR: Obama will do a “Connect the dots” speech……

http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=143178163&m=143190222&t=audio

 

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Progressivist Setup in August 2011 for Obama speech today? Listen carefully from 2:08 min mark to end. 

 

 

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Add a Little Saul Alinsky:

Alinsky was deeply influenced by the great social science insight of his times, one developed by his professors at Chicago: that the pathologies of the urban poor were not hereditary but environmental. This idea, that people could change their lives by changing their surroundings, led him to take an obscure social science phrase–“the community organization”–and turn it into, in the words of Alinsky biographer Sanford Horwitt, “something controversial, important, even romantic.

His starting point was an early fascination with John L. Lewis, the great labor leader and founder of the CIO. What if, Alinsky wondered, the same hardheaded tactics used by unions could be applied to the relationship between citizens and public officials?

“It’s true that the notion of self-interest was critical,” Obama told me. “But Alinsky understated the degree to which people’s hopes and dreams and their ideals and their values were just as important in organizing as people’s self-interest.” He continued, “Sometimes the tendency in community organizing of the sort done by Alinsky was to downplay the power of words and of ideas when in fact ideas and words are pretty powerful. We hold these truths to be self-evident, all men are created equal.’ Those are just words. I have a dream.’ Just words. But they help move things. And I think it was partly that understanding that probably led me to try to do something similar in different arenas.”

Speaking of what he learned as an organizer, Obama himself told me, “I think that oftentimes ordinary citizens are taught that decisions are made based on the public interest or grand principles, when, in fact, what really moves things is money and votes and power.”

[L]inks between his [Obama’s] organizing work then and his current campaign, he interrupted: “I think there is. I don’t think you need to strain for it.” He was at home talking Alinskian jargon about “agitation,” which he defined as “challenging people to scrape away habit,” and he fondly recalled organizing workshops where he learned the concept of “being predisposed to other people’s power.”

Obama was a fan of Alinsky’s realistic streak. “The key to creating successful organizations was making sure people’s self-interest was met,” he told me, “and not just basing it on pie-in-the-sky idealism. So there were some basic principles that remained powerful then, and in fact I still believe in.”

More here………

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From Alinsky “Rules for Radicals”

As an organizer I start where the world is, as it is, not as I would like it to be. That we accept the world as it is does not in any sense weaken our desire to change it into what we believe it should be — it is necessary to begin where the world is if we are going to change it to what we think it should be. — P. xix

If the organizer begins with an affirmation of love for people, he promptly turns everyone off. If, on the other hand, he begins with a denunciation of exploiting employers, slum landlords, police shakedowns, gouging merchants, he is inside their experience and they accept him. — P.98

LINK

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Listen carefully from 0:40 to o:50

And the ALINSKY words: From 1:02 min. to 2:12 min.

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Add the pinch of Czar Cass Sunstein:

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America, don’t succumb to the Romantic words of an orator.  THINK for yourselves.

Obama and the Progressives within America think We the People are Homer Simpsons.

Alinsky was deeply influenced by the great social science insight of his times, one developed by his professors at Chicago: that the pathologies of the urban poor were not hereditary but environmental. This idea, that people could change their lives by changing their surroundings, led him to take an obscure social science phrase–“the community organization”–and turn it into, in the words of Alinsky biographer Sanford Horwitt, “something controversial, important, even romantic.

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– H.W. Brands, University of Texas

Brands is the author of a Roosevelt biography calledT.R.— The Last Romantic.

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Public manipulation BY DESIGN

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Related Link:

Are We a NATION of Cowards? Is Obama Condoning the Marxists/Communists/Anarchists Actions?

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